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Digital Trends - The future of biometric tracking will make step counters look like antiques
By now, you’re probably already familiar with activity trackers — in fact, everyone you know who’s even remotely active has a Fitbit or something similar, even if they barely ever use it. Wearables and trackers like the Fitbit have been around for years, and while the information they provide — heart rate, sleep patterns, GPS — is invaluable, it only scratches the surface of what biometric data can offer. Biometrics — the science and technology of analyzing biological data — can be as simple as taking your heart rate before and after a run, and as complicated as a blood test that determines your hormone and glucose levels. Wearable activity monitors are a basic form of biometrics, and while some of the consumer-facing ones are quite sophisticated, the technology that’s on the horizon is much more advanced and extremely exciting.
Digital Trends - MLB uses Whoop Strap to record and analyze baseball players’ recovery time
Sports-related injuries seem to be on the rise these days. This really should not come as a surprise. Athletes are pushing themselves further on a daily basis, walking a fine line between strain and gain. Whoop wants to make sure athletes continue to improve by resting when they need it. We have reported in the past about the Whoop Strap and what it can provide for an individual. The aim is to teach the wearer about how their body responds to strenuous activity, because after a hard workout or game, your body needs time to recover. The strap tracks your heart rate, skin conductivity, ambient temperature, and motion throughout the day. Afterward, it suggests how much sleep is needed to fully recover.
Sports Illustrated - WHOOP finds positive results from largest performance study in U.S. pro sports
With the completion of the largest performance study ever conducted with a professional U.S. sports league, human performance company WHOOP is continuing to give sports organizations smarter data and insight into the relationship between physiological status and performance. In partnership with Major League Baseball, the study included voluntary participation from 230 minor league players across nine MLB organizations, including the San Francisco Giants, Atlanta Braves and Baltimore Orioles. The study—which occurred from June to November of this year—ultimately confirmed a positive correlation between monitoring recovery and performance, the Boston-based company found.
MLB Network - Will Ahmed on Whoop product
Will Ahmed sits down with the guys on Hot Stove to discuss baseball testing the Whoop product, describe what it does and more.
WHOOP - WHOOP Announces Findings of Largest Performance Study Ever Conducted in Professional Sports
Minor League Players from Nine Major League Baseball Organizations Participated in Continuous Physiological Monitoring of Players with WHOOP Technology
Sport Techie - WHOOP Finds Positive Results From Largest Performance Study In U.S. Pro Sports
With the completion of the largest performance study ever conducted with a professional U.S. sports league, human performance company WHOOP is continuing to give sports organizations smarter data and insight into the relationship between physiological status and performance. In partnership with Major League Baseball, the study included voluntary participation from 230 minor league players across nine MLB organizations, including the San Francisco Giants, Atlanta Braves and Baltimore Orioles. The study — which occurred from June to November of this year — ultimately confirmed a positive correlation between monitoring recovery and performance, the Boston-based company found.
USA Today - MLB device aimed at improving performance
NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – In his pursuit of a new baseball home this offseason, free agent closer Mark Melancon came armed with an array of questions to his interview with the San Francisco Giants. As an athlete who’s finely tuned with his body, Melancon wanted to learn about the club’s training and recovery methods. Among other things, Melancon found out the Giants have a sleep room in the clubhouse, will travel in all first-class seats this coming season and have consulted sleep experts to help them choose the least-disruptive times to travel during the season and playoffs.
Road Trail Run - 2016 Run Tech Holiday Gift Guide and Mini Reviews-GPS, Garmin, Polar, Fitbit, Lumo, Whoop, Bose, Epson, AppleWatch Nike+
2016 had me testing dozens of gadgets: GPS watches, activity bands, innovative run form coaching sensors and apps, and music earphones as part of assignments as the wearable tech and music columnist for Competitor Magazine. Many fine and innovative products came to market. My picks below represent a variety of price points and highlights. You can shop for many of these products at the ads and links at the end of the article. Whoop is the most ingenious, useful and deeply scientifically grounded performance wearable I have tested this year. A very slim heart rate and sleep sensing band monitors your heart rate at an amazing 100 times per seconds detecting at your deepest sleep moment your Variable Heart Rate (VHR), scientifically proven to be one of the best measures of true recovery from training and stress and strains of daily life . Until now VRH has been very difficult to measure without sophisticated equipment or time consuming daily tests.
WHOOP - The Strengths and Weaknesses of HRV as a Recovery Metric
WHOOP White Paper
SI.com - WHOOP goes direct-to-consumer with performance wearable system
Wearable technology and performance company WHOOP announced that as of Tuesday it is making publicly available its performance optimization system, a product that was only offered to professional or college athletes, military, Olympians or via select pre-orders. According to Will Ahmed, founder and CEO, the WHOOP Strap 2.0 will continue to deliver “actionable data” to athletes, teams and trainers to optimize performance, something he believes is missing from other competing tracking devices on the market today. “I think where wearables or trackers have failed to date is that they tell you a vague version of what’s happened, but they don’t tell you effectively what to do,” he said. “From a product standpoint, we can now tell teams and athletes, ‘This is what you need to do to perform at a higher level.’ We really designed the whole product from that standpoint where you can wake up with a recovery and that recovery tells you how much strain your body is capable of taking on.